DSST Principles of Public Speaking Exam

Are you a whiz at public speaking? If so, you may want to receive college credit for what you already know. DSST is a prior learning assessment program that is recognized at thousands of colleges and universities nationwide. If you think the DSST Principles of Public Speaking exam might be right for you, make an appointment with your academic advisor before registering, just to confirm that your college accepts DSST.

The DSST Principles of Public Speaking exam counts for three semester hours of lower-level baccalaureate credit – freeing up time and money for the classes you really need.

The DSST Principles of Public Speaking exam is unique in that it has two parts: an 84-question multiple-choice section and an impromptu speech section (most DSST exams consist only of a multiple-choice section). The speech is approximately four minutes long (no more than five minutes and no less than three minutes) and will be recorded. You will be given a specific persuasive speech topic and you will have 10 minutes to prepare.

The multiple-choice section of the DSST Principles of Public Speaking exam covers these topics:

  1. Ethical, Historical, and Social Considerations of Public Speaking
  2. Audience Analysis and Adaptation/ Effect/Persuasive
  3. Topics and Purposes of Speeches
  4. Structure/Organization
  5. Content/Supporting Materials
  6. Research
  7. Language and Style
  8. Delivery
  9. Communication Apprehension
  10. Listening and Feedback
  11. Criticism and Evaluation

For a more detailed outline of the DSST Principles of Public Speaking exam, including a percentage breakdown of each category, be sure to check out a DSST study guide.

DSST Principles of Public Speaking Practice Questions

1. Which of the following are effective listening techniques?

A. Interrupt to ask questions; paraphrase
B. Focus; don’t form opinions too soon
C. Lean forward; tap on the table
D. Make eye contact; avoid being defensive
E. a, b, and d

2. Which of the following series lists the elements of effective communication?

A. Sender, receiver, message, channel, feedback
B. Sender, receiver, message, direction, response
C. Speaker, listener, point, medium, reaction
D. Speaker, respondent, purpose, route, organization
E. To, from, directionality, reason, accomplishment

3. Broadly speaking, in our culture personal space is typically _____, while social space is _____. Of these types of spaces, _____ is more likely to affect how communication is shaped.

A. 0-3 feet; 4-12 feet; social space
B. 1 1/2-4 feet; 4-12 feet; personal space
C. 1 1/2-4 feet; 4-12 feet; social space
D. 0-3 feet; 4-12 feet; personal space
E. 1 1/2-4 feet; 3-7 feet; personal space

4. Which type of nonverbal message deals with belonging, control, respect, or disapproval?

A. Emotive messages
B. Relational messages
C. Relationship messages
D. Interpersonal messages
E. Intrapersonal messages

5. What is involved in language comprehension?

A. Hearing sounds, processing words and organizing them, understanding abstract components, interpreting meaning
B. Hearing sounds and understanding their meanings
C. Speaking the same language as the sender
D. Identifying word units, knowing their meanings, understanding their syntactical use, processing abstractions, interpreting meaning
E. All of the above

6. To what degree is effective listening natural to all people?

A. An innate ability to listen effectively is inborn
B. An innate ability to listen effectively is inborn for some people
C. An innate ability to listen effectively is inborn, but is quickly lost if not nurtured
D. An innate ability to listen effectively is inborn for some people, but will be lost if not nurtured by age three
E. An innate ability to listen effectively is not a natural skill

7. Expressive language competency requires:

A. Oral language
B. Gesture
C. Tone
D. Context
E. All of the above

8. The best way to emphasize an important point in a public presentation is:

A. Prepare the audience by telling them you are about to reveal a key point
B. Speak more quickly to attract the audience’s attention
C. Speak more slowly to give the audience time to consider what is being said
D. Pause for a long moment before delivering the point
E. Speak loudly to alert those whose minds are drifting

9. Within a classroom setting, the reason for a debate is:

A. To determine which side has the most correct answers
B. To teach students to research, collaborate, argue, and listen
C. To demonstrate to students that there is no ultimate truth
D. To cast doubt on the other side’s position
E. All of the above

10. The earliest known writing on dramatic theory was:

A. Plato’s poetics
B. Aristotle’s poetics
C. Virgil’s poetics
D. Virgil’s dramatica
E. Plato’s allegories

DSST Principles of Public Speaking Practice Questions Answer Key

 

Last Updated: June 4, 2019